Residential Permissions

Hi
Being new to the drone world, a question I need help with, as the Mavic Air 2 is over 250g how do I get permission to do an aerial photo of our house as its in a residential area?

Thanks

1 Like

Off the top of my head, and I’m not deeply intimate with the 250g+ regulations because I only have a Mini, I would say you’re out of luck. But it may depend if you hold A2 CofC or Article 16.

The best bet is to go through Where can I fly my drone in the UK? - Good 2 Go - Can I fly my drone here? and see what the answer is.

3 Likes

Cheers for the link, seems for now I will have to wait until I can add a mini or the like alongside the Mavic to achieve the aerial shot.

You may have luck if you ask ALL the neighbours that are within the “prohibited” area. Tell them what you want to do and when and make them involved - let them watch you and show them the screen of your controller as you fly.

Might work!

5 Likes

Thanks Mac,
I think it’s worth a try , can offer them a pic of their Houses and gardens too :wink:

2 Likes

Technically Macspite is kind of correct. Flying around a congested area if you don’t hold an A2CofC is out of your control as you’d have to be 150m away from the boundary of said area, even holding a A2 your still only down to 50m. You can take off and land only within 30m. And have to fly away from congestion. Being above 250g is a disadvantage.
Article 16. Only applies to FPVuk or BMFA etc members, it’s through their membership you can fly using articles 16. Again your separation distances are reduced to 30m but your drone is still to heavy to fly within the confines of your garden and not over fly a property or persons. Even flying directly above just your property still means your breaking the 30 or 50m rule.
Keep a record of your flight, conduct a RAMs (risk assessment for that day).
Notify your neighbours of a time a date, if you want to contact police using 101 and notify them just to cover your ass, you can do. Take all the safety concerns you think you’ll need if someone reports your flight or if something does go wrong. Have a spotter with you a second sets of eyes and ears is being safe. Plan your flight, and continue. Legally you shouldn’t be doing it, as Article 16 only applies to recreational flights in open space not in housing estates, but a short quick flight will suffice you doing the RAMs and using a spotter. Keep a record of your flight
Don’t go stupidity high or hoover over a road or neighbours houses

3 Likes

Thank you Dren

1 Like

And only applies to the following areas

A built-up area which is only used substantially for recreational
purposes may be considered a ‘suitable area’. Operation within
such an area must be supported by a risk assessment. 
2 Likes

Much as I understand why the CAA rules are what they are, I suspect that the awareness of “der rulz” is rather limited amongst a lot of users who maybe got a drone off a well-known internet auction site or from a local shop.

I say this because I popped outside to check on one of the cats the other evening, and I saw a small drone circling near a house across the road and down a bit from me. If I’d not recognised those red flashing lights and flight pattern as a drone I’d have never known what it was. I doubt any other neighbours had a clue, especially not the moany ones.

Not that I would condone breaking any rules like. But small drones are not really that obvious especially if they are up a bit and there’s enough traffic noise to drown out the sound of the props.

GC

3 Likes

And if it was a Mini 2 then no rules were being broken

2 Likes

thanks for finding the link

4 Likes

Just invest in a sub 250g drone, there’s a few to choose from. You can fly them practically anywhere within reason obviously common sense is in order avoid flying low around houses that are not aware of the flight to avoid breaking privacy laws. And check for air space restrictions. Definitely worth the investment for the freedom of flight :ok_hand:t2:

4 Likes

Yes, could well have been a mini, my point was more that if it’s a small drone (mini or mavic size) then it’s not very noticeable. Some of those may be within the rules, some may not. But unless the pilot gets unlucky or is very visible, in general many will go unnoticed. Thankfully I think the population is a lot less excited by drones than the tabloids would have us believe- which is a great thing for our hobby (and likely at least in part due to the responsible behaviours promoted by the likes of FPV-UK and on here).

Thankfully where I live at least we don’t have much interest in drones by police or local authorities, when I started flying I was always worried about having to prove I was flying within the rules but now I am much more relaxed about it as I’ve found that most people are not interested and those who are have all been positive. OK, I will always fly within the rules anyway as I’m that kind of person and I always try to be discrete, but it’s not quite as worrying these days even when I’m flying non-work related!

GC

2 Likes

That was my initial conclusion to buy a mini later in the year as I would rather air on the side of caution and the law. May have to save a bit or add it to my Christmas list lol :laughing:

Please let me know have you got a2 coc certificate other wise u can’t fly close to resendential.commercial ,industrial, and recreational area you just fly in a1 category. If you have a2 coc certificate you can fly in recreational area and maintain the safe distance from the house at least 50 meter. If you need any more help feel free to ask me thanks

1 Like

As others have pointed out, with a “transitional drone” (e.g. non “C” labelled units, which don’t exist on the market yet) that weigh betweeen 251g and 25kg you’ll be limited to flying in the A3 category, and this restricts you to 150m horizontally away from residential/built up areas.

With A2CofC qualification you can fly in residential areas but must still maintain 50m separation distance from uninvolved people, with no intentional overflights.

There are also privacy/trespass concerns to consider and Sean from Geeksvana covers some of those in this video:

Ref flying over buildings/structures themselves, see the “What About Flying Near To Vehicles, Vessels, and Structures?” section of this comprehensive article from Heliguy:

2 Likes

Shame you missed the original Mini dumped by Argos at £229 for the combo. DJI’s cheapest drone is now the Mini SE which has made a UK appearance, listed by Argos (out of stock, not got any yet?) and Jessops.

1 Like