RC Pro Controller with FCC hack?

Any running an fcc hack on their rc pro controller and mavic 3
Been looking For one but no luck

Have you checked the Birdmap on Dronehacks?

Can’t see a fcc hack for my rc pro

You download the android apk

https://drone-hacks.com/DHCompanion/DHCompanion-1.0.12.apk

There is a hack but not available by any of the drone websites that usually do these hacks, I had mine done a couple of Months back, & wow what a difference it makes, takes your power levels up from 100mw to 1995mw nearly 2w.
It really unleashes the beast shall we say, you have to get yourself in touch with a guy called Sincoder found over on https://mavicpilots.com/ he is based in China and via TeamViewer he remotely links via your PC/Laptop to the RC Pro and software mods it at root level, I was sceptical at first but he proved me wrong, takes about 10 min to complete, since then he has done the same hack for quite a few of the guys over at Mavicpilots, if I remember rightly he charges around £20 via paypal, but you must not upgrade your firmware on the RC Pro or it will revert back to CE power, he offers a higher charge so you can upgrade your firmware as many times as you need and he will do the hack free.

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The drone hacks DHCompanion apk does not work on the RC Pro, just android phones only.

With great power comes great responsibility.

The DJI Drones use the AX chipset all in one RF solution for the Ocusync system. I don’t believe they are rated to 2Watt RF output, probably half that. That’s one of the reasons I went with the regular FCC mod on my DJI FPV drone rather than using the free B3YOND patch that provided 1.4Watts.

When you drive a RF device beyond its linear operating specification bad things can happen, such as unwanted thermal issues. Then there are those you won’t be aware of, such as increased phase noise and high spurious and harmonic content.

I’m not saying that as soon as you switch your drone on you’ll bring about Armagedon, but it’s worth knowing the risks that using such powers on the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands can create.

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I’m sure the DJI engineers will have done their homework ( unless it’s the GPS chipset team ) when they sourced the US supply region, their equipment is designed to run at these outputs and no less when using the RC Pro, and there will lots in use over there in a much bigger market than ours.
This is for the Mavic 3 range and not the FPV models.

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I’m not saying they didn’t, but when it comes to consumer items the components used are generally only rated to 15% to 20% above what their intended use is, for profit margin reasons. In the US FCC EIRP (Effective Isotropic Radiated Power) power limit on 5.8GHz is 53dBm, which equates to a maximum of 30dBm, or 1Watt, from the transmitter and a maximum antenna gain of 23dBi (gain over a theoretical isotropic radiator).

In terms of RF penetration going from 1Watt to 2Watt, an increase of 3dB has very little effect. RF field density obeys the inverse square rule, meaning to see any effective change in field strength the power needs to be increased by 6dB or by 4X. Doing the common CE to FCC patches, 25mW to 700mW, an increase of nearly 15dB is more effective than going from 700mW to 1.4Watts which is only an increase of 3dB. Add to this that the devices used will have an efficiency rating, as an example 85%, the other 15% will be lost in the main as heat. This is assuming the device is still operating in its designed parameters and is linear. Once this limit is exceeded the efficiency falls of quite sharply resulting in greater in a greater heat to radiated power ratio. In other words the law of diminishing returns.

I’m not against anyone using there gear in what manor they deem fit, unless it presents an issue to others. I just want o make people aware that using the Nigel Tufnell amplifier theorem of “Everything at eleven” doesn’t make Baby Lick My Love Pump sound any better.

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Not that i would use the the higher power but nice to have it :sunglasses:

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Cheers Nidge that’s good to know.

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