CAA incoming rules


#1

Don’t expect it to make any difference!


#2

Hmmmm!

I’m convinced that around 50% of what I read on the Internet is true… as for the other 50%, well… :thinking:


#3

The bad publicity is so daft at the moment and for the most part unsubstantiated. RC has been around for decades, but haters only arrived with quadcopters. I guess so unfortunately did idiot pilots. I can understand laws and drone registration, but a test is daft. Just don’t break the law! If your an idiot doing stupid things, then you’re not going to be responsible enough to take any test!

Where will the line will be drawn between a quadcopter AKA drone and other RC hobbies? Anyone can build an automated/stabilised helicopter, plane and glider, but outside of these papers, these seem to be completed overlooked/ ignored. People hear drone and see only 4 blades.

My understanding is that these regulations also apply to 250g plus non-camera LOS quadcopters etc with no automated flight modes and limited flight control ranges. Better clarity and definitions are really needed as these should be considered as a toy and outside the scope of the requirement for a test.

How do they plan to cover all the toy quadcopters over 250g being sold and flown in back gardens and parks?

The idea of having to take a test is ridiculous, and I’m sure will become a hobby cash cow similar to PfCO courses.
Where will we have to go for this test? How long will the wait list be and what will they want us to do? If it’s a flight test, then how do you learn before this test if you can’t fly before it! Hobbies are meant to be fun, but the fun is being drained at the moment.

Sorry for the rant, it just a shame that after close to 30 years of RC hobbies that things are the way they are.


#4

I agree, I don’t see how they can single out multi rotors when RC has been around for years, other forms of RC aircraft pose an equal amount of risk, if not more. Take helis for instance, they have casued significant injuries and fatalities, no law governs those.