Flying in the EU

If you are going to fly in the EU you need a registration from an EU country which is then valid all over the EU. (If we had stayed in EASA then the UK one would have been OK)
This link is for a training company in Luxembourg who will provide this free of charge (currently). It’s all free and in English. A bit more involved than our test but very straightforward. On passing the test you get a certificate from the Luxembourg Civil Aviation Authority which is good for all of the EU for A1and A3
This is purely for recreational flying.
Rules can vary slighly from country to country but they are basically the same as ours. Some countries, Spain, Holland, Germany that I know of also require you to have fireproof id plates with the maker, model, serial no, name and contact no. This has to be on the drone and controller. I’m trying to find someone to supply these at a reasonable price, maybe a local jeweller.

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Just done it!

Now all I need is some means of getting the cash for a European Holiday. PITA having to do a different test to fly in Europe but at least we have our blue bananas and bendy passports back! :frowning:

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Not A2? Or have I missed something?

No it only covers A1 and A3. From what I can see A2 requires their equivalent of A2CoC but there does appear to be same transition period as we have.

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Was it a formal test like the A2

No its the equivalent of the UK drone registration test

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Didn’t I read (on here) somewhere that the EU aren’t officially recognising the UK A2CofC? :thinking:

I have just done it - see above - and IMHO it is harder than the UK registration test and the one-and -a-half hour course is between the UK reg and A2 C of C in complexity.

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Yes because it’s a Certificate of training not of competency.

Please provide a citation for this. I’m not saying you’re wrong but I’ve seen no evidence a UK coft is any less valid than a German or Luxembourg coft

Yes - once we left the EU ours is not valid.

The equivalent in Lux requires a classroom visit, so not fully online.

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“The UK has not yet initiated the above recognition process, so as things stand the UK certificates cannot be recognised yet for the purpose of UAS operations within in the single European sky airspace.”

Add UAV operations to the list of Brexit fallouts where the Government has overlooked a fairly straightforward process which could have avoided a whole heap of additional paperwork…

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Brill thanks.

I took this test a while back just in case. At that time I couldn’t find anything in English. Luckily the exam is so incredibly easy you can pass without issue even in German.

I did find it slightly more in depth then the UK one and there was also a time limit on the German one.

I’m hoping to visit Austria after lockdown with drone. I contacted Austro Control (customer.relations@austrocontrol.at) and asked them what I needed to fly my drone in Austria. I have A2 CofC in UK and also the EASA A1/A3 from Luxembourg
Their reply was - no further action or CofC are needed to fly within Austrian airspace, as you have already registered yourself as an operator and have the appropriate CofC to fly within the open category. Please make sure that the foreseen area of operation is not located within a control area or flight restriction areas. You can check the UAS-specific zones and airspaces on map.dronespace.at or within the Austro Control dronespace app.

Looks like I’m good to go, although I will be taking a hard copy of the email with me - just in case!

Blockquote

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Moi aussi!

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I’ve just done it too!

I totally agree with you. This is head and shoulders above the UK Reg/DMARES in both terms of content and presentation.

Ned

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May be having a senior moment but which of the e-learning courses in the drop down is it?
Can’t see anything that could be the one.

You need to register first. Once done, you can crack on. They also send you and email with a link to the course.

Ned

Interesting… please let us know what you manage to find :+1:

I did this a while back, I have also done extensive digging on what is required to fly your drone in the EU, in particular spain as I have a place there and wish to fly my drone there.

You should think of the Luxembourg certificate as a flyer ID, it is not an Operator ID. Each EU country have their own registration system to register your drone and obtain an operator ID, in Spain it is a nightmare and I haven’t achieved it yet, I don’t think they could make it any more difficult if they employed a man from difficult city in difficult land!!

On a more positive note, I found the Luxembourg trg and test really good and well designed, if you have a grasp on the EASA regulations it’s pretty easy.

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