Neighbour complaint

My neighbour has just learnt that I got a drone for Christmas. He has ordered me not to fly over their garden - our houses are semi-detached - and certainly not with the camera on. I fully understand the pricay issue but simplying flying over? He also told me not to video the church from a drone becase the “criminal element” will be able to identify the lead roof. What is my leal position? I am a complete newbie.

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Sounds like a neighbour from hell, do you want to fly over his property ? Regardless of the fact there is nothing to stop you your first few flights should be in a clear open area away from buildings, trees , power lines and other obstacles so you can get used to the controls and how your drone handles, if my neighbour “ ordered “ me like that I wouldn’t be putting his bins out any more !:rofl: plenty more advice will follow from this fantastic group I am sure :+1:t2:
PS when I say you can overfly his property you do however need to be aware that there are certain areas that have flight restrictions due to their locations ie Airports, Military establishments etc check out drone scene in the drop down menu to see if your area or indeed anywhere you intend to fly has any restrictions to consider

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From a legal stand point. If your drone is sub 250 and you take off from your land, and you keep vlos, don’t invade his privacy there is nothing he can do. However if you were on numerous occasions did hover over his garden for example, he could possibly claim alarm harassment and distress which could be construde as an offence. But if you hover in your garden zooming in to his with the camera what would his attitude be.

Your neigbour sounds like a right karen Adrian. :roll_eyes:

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Assuming you have a sub 250g drone then you are entitled to do whatever you want in your back garden, within your boundaries. You can assure him that you wouldn’t/won’t record him or his family…etc. There’s nothing legally he can then do but if he wants to be difficult then he might call the police and they may want to review your footage to prove you haven’t infringed on their privacy.

Obviously you want to avoid that and might help if you just mention it to him that you have no interest whatsoever in filming him, that you’re only practicing manouvers …etc

Would suggest you find a public park somewhere to practice. Again if it’s a sub 250g drone then no one can complain because it’s a public place, as long as you aren’t endangering anyone or being reckless…etc

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Maybe we should have a GADC meeting at yours :joy:

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Sounds like a charmer :roll_eyes:

Tell him you don’t need to, you have a great view out of your rear bedroom window thanks, and Google Maps covers the areas of his garden that you can’t see from there anyway.

Tell him the criminals have their own drones, they don’t waste their time searching for videos on the internet.

Fly within the drone code, that’s the only legal position you need.

Try this:

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After you have videoed the church say two hail Mary’s and one our father and you’ll be fine. :wink:

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Just spat my coffee all over my desk reading that :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

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That they nicked from Drone safe register, or curry’s

I wouldn’t let them anywhere near any footage, they have no right except if they suspect you of terrorism (section 43)

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Sorry mate, but as i see it you’re issue isn’t the legality of what you’re doing, rather your neighbour laying down the law.
Obviously you want to be legal near other homes and people.

I know its just words I’m typing and i don’t know your situation, but I’d tell him to eff off and mind your own business

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When I first purchased my drone the next door neighbour was having a right whinge and I wasn’t even flying at fence level. He told me he was calling the Council to complain! :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy: :joy:

I’m still waiting for the bin lorry to roll up with a team of highly trained refuse collectors armed with battering rams for a 5am raid! :joy:

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As far as I understand it. So long as the CAA permits you to fly in that area(e.g it’s not near an airport or a prison) (check on the drone assist app) then, assuming you have a sub 250g drone you are allowed to fly over his house and the church. Now obviously, poking in through windows as such is a bad idea and could give grounds for an injunction but that is expensive for both him and you. So legally. you are allowed to.

Personally, I would try the nice neighbour approach first. Perhaps his views come from misconceptions of the size and capabilities of the drone so perhaps offer to show him the screen, what it can and cannot do along with a copy of the drone code so you can demonstrate competence. Throwing the law at people seldom resolves anything if they are coming from an entrenched viewpoint, whereas offering to work with them on their worries seems to be more effective…

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Airspace is legally classified as a public highway. Precedents were set in the 1850’s and then again in the late 1940’s concerning overflight of private property. The 40’s ruling also found concerning photographing someone’s house from an aircraft. Both judgements found in favour of the pilot. Right to privacy only holds if you"re less than 80 feet above the tallest structure within the curtilage of the property. Reasonable right to privacy doesn’t count if the overflight of a disputed area is a waypoint on a longer flight path but you need to be above the reasonable ceiling (100 feet to be safe). As long as there isn’t a recognised and legal restriction in place, you have the right to fly. By the way: this comes from a qualified barrister.

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Thanks for a very thoughtful reply. I certainly have no intention of invoking the law. I wanted advice on what the law said which you have provided. I am adopting the considerate neighbour approach but he is anti-technology as well as a solicitor!. I explained that I had no intention of filming him or his property but his garden shed has been burgled twice in the last five years and he is worried that any footage of mine will ne a goldmine to the criminal classes. As another member pointed out, the criminals have their own drones which is a far more efficient way of “casing” a property than spending hours on YouTube. I offered to show him the capabilities of the drone but he dismissed the offer saying that he wishes technology had stopped at the begiining of the 20th century - despite owning a yop of the range Range Rover. In the meantime I will keep my head, and the drone, down and fly in open public spaces. Thanks again

As a solicitor you’d think he’d have half an ounce of sense? The only people I know that have any interest in photos of sheds are entrants in the GADC birthday competition.

My pleasure and you’re welcome. By the sounds of it: you’ve met your first ‘Mr. Bombastic’. I’ll bet you a dollar that his attitude to using surveillance technology alters when it applies to the dashcam I’m sure he has stuck to the windscreen of his Chelsea tractor or the security cameras covering his shed.
Just as a note - keep an eye on the ‘public spaces’ you fly in as well. A lot of Parish, Borough and County councils now have by-laws in place prohibiting use of parks and public spaces for drone flight irrespective of weight class. To cover all your bases, I’d suggest that you carry all three forms of DMARES compliance whenever you head out for a flight. Photo I.D (driving license) - a screenshot of your CAA drone registration details and the A1 & A3 open category proof of competency “card” you can download from your CAA account. If P.C. Plod does amble up: these will be the first things that will be asked for.

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Or our very own DroneScene for a much nicer experience/interface

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Interesting. My local park (covered by bylaws) is full of students smoking dope and on Tuesday a mini 3 was being flown around quite openly. Not causing any problems And no interest from the local constabulary. And there was me scoping it out for an early morning flight. Why do I bother?

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