Open consultation Drone legislation: use, restrictions and enforcement


#1

Don’t think that this has been posted yet. I haven’t read through yet, just posting for information

Open consultation launched today (26/7) Drone legislation: use, restrictions and enforcement.https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/drone-legislation-use-restrictions-and-enforcement

Summary - Policy proposals for safer use of drones plus powers to police for enforcement. This consultation closes on 17 September 2018
The proposed policies include:

the miniumum age requirement for operators for small unmanned aircraft
whether the 1km flight restriction around protected aerodromes is sufficient
a proposal to mandate and regulate a Flight Information and Notification System (FINS) or just regulate the FINS
the powers required by enforcement bodies in order to properly police drone use and penalise incorrect use, including the possible use of fixed penalty notices
counter drone technology system proposals
The proposals build on the legislation made by the Benefits of drones to the UK economy and The Air Navigation (Amendment) Order 2018.


Policy proposals for safer use of drones plus powers to police for enforcement
Government Drone Consultation
#2

This is the foreword

Drones and unmanned aircraft present both exciting benefits to society, and challenges we must address.

Since the end of the Department for Transport’s drone consultation last year, there has been considerable activity which has further highlighted the potential benefits that drones can bring to the UK. In November, the industrial strategy set out how we are building a Britain fit for the future, with significant opportunities for new modes of transport to revolutionise how we transport people and goods around the country. In February, Nesta announced the 5 cities selected as part of the Flying High Challenge, working together to develop aspirations for drone use based on local community needs and ambitions. In May, PwC announced that the social and economic benefits of drones in the UK by 2030 could be as much as £16bn in net cost savings, adding £42bn to GDP, with over 600,000 drone sector jobs.

But drones can also be misused, risking safety, security and privacy.1 As we look to the future, the Government is focused on ensuring the potential of drones is harnessed for the UK, whilst appropriately addressing the risks. In the last year, the Government has taken action to do so. In May, we amended current laws relating to small unmanned aircraft (also referred to in this document as “small drones”) to put in place new flying restrictions, and introduce registration and pilot test competency requirements. The 400ft height and flying near aerodromes restrictions will come into force on 30th July 2018.

But this was just the first step in the drones legislative programme being developed by the Department for Transport. This consultation is the next. Your views will shape the content and impact of a draft Drones Bill covering new technology such as apps and possible future drone traffic management systems, and police powers to enforce the law. This consultation also covers the minimum age for being an operator of a small drone and the recent restriction on flying near aerodromes which we put in place. Finally we are seeking your input into how counter-drone technology in the UK could and should be used to protect sensitive national infrastructure and large events from potential malicious use of drones.
We want our measures to help create the right conditions for this technology to grow, tackling misuse of the technology and ensuring the public’s trust in the sector. Ensuring drones are being used safely and properly will pave the way for their increasing use in society. This aligns with the approach of the Future of Mobility Grand Challenge and the Government’s modern industrial strategy.

As well as this, in 2019, the DfT will publish our Aviation Strategy, where the use of innovative technology and a new approach to regulation is integral to delivering cleaner, quieter and quicker journeys. This is an exciting and pivotal moment for the use of drones in the UK.


#3

Executive summary

Last year the Department for Transport (DfT) published its response to the consultation ‘Unlocking the UK’s high tech economy: consultation on the use of drones in the UK’ which set out proposals to develop the UK’s policy and regulatory framework for drones. As now, our approach was to address the challenges without restricting opportunity, to ensure the UK remained competitive in this developing market sector, whilst maintaining high standards.

In the UK, drones are used by a wide variety of industries and public sector services. The police, fire service and search and rescue use drones in emergency situations, providing vital support in critical situations. Farmers use them to inspect crop growth, and maximise their output. They are also used in a wide variety of harsh and difficult environments, and reduce the risks associated with this work. There are possibilities for business and the public sector to create new high tech jobs and boost the UK economy in ways which could not have been conceived a few years ago.

On 30th May 2018 the Government laid new legislation in the Houses of Parliament, amending the Air Navigation Order 2016, to introduce:
 A height restriction of 400ft for all small drones;
 A 1km restriction on all small drone flights around protected aerodromes;
 A registration scheme for operators of small drones of a mass between 250g and 20kg inclusive; and
 Competence requirements for remote pilots of small drones of a mass between 250g and 20kg inclusive.
Exemptions can be made for innovative, commercial use of drones above 400ft or within 1km of a protected aerodrome boundary if the CAA deems it appropriate and safe to do so.

These new measures, alongside an upcoming draft Drones Bill, are the first step in setting the UK on a path to be a global leader in the drones market, tackling misuse to build public confidence in drone technology and encourage positive, innovative drone use in the UK.

This consultation covers:
Next steps following the amendments made to the Air Navigation Order 2016 by the Air Navigation (Amendment) Order 2018 (the 2018 AThe possible content of a draft Drones Bill:
 The proposed use of a flight information and notification system (FINS) or systems (FINSs) prior to and/or whilst flying certain types of drone or for certain types of users, and how this could or should be regulated;
 Police powers relating to drones and fixed penalty notices;

Looking further forward:
 How counter-drone technology could be used as a means of addressing the potential threat malicious misuse of drones can pose; and
 The estimated growth in numbers of commercial drones in the UK over future years.

The views gathered in this consultation will influence the future steps Government takes. Aviation is a reserved matter (i.e. the subject matter has not been devolved to the devolved parliaments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). As such, aviation legislation, including drone-specific legislation, is the responsibility of the UK Parliament. It is anticipated that any legislation resulting from this consultation will extend to the whole UK.

The Government will keep this under review and continue to engage with the devolved administrations as policy proposals develop and any proposed legislation is drafted.mendment Order):
 The proposed age limit for small drone operators
 Whether the airport restriction coming into force on 30th July 2018 is sufficient,
and if not, what kind of further extension should be considered;

The possible content of a draft Drones Bill:
 The proposed use of a flight information and notification system (FINS) or systems (FINSs) prior to and/or whilst flying certain types of drone or for certain types of users, and how this could or should be regulated;
 Police powers relating to drones and fixed penalty notices;
Looking further forward:
 How counter-drone technology could be used as a means of addressing the potential threat malicious misuse of drones can pose; and
 The estimated growth in numbers of commercial drones in the UK over future years.

The views gathered in this consultation will influence the future steps Government takes. Aviation is a reserved matter (i.e. the subject matter has not been devolved to the devolved parliaments in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland). As such, aviation legislation, including drone-specific legislation, is the responsibility of the UK Parliament. It is anticipated that any legislation resulting from this consultation will extend to the whole UK.

The Government will keep this under review and continue to engage with the devolved administrations as policy proposals develop and any proposed legislation is drafted.


#4

They don’t seem to give a damn about recreational users. It’s all about business and what drones can do for the economy.

Who gives a damn about the people who bought into the technology in its infancy and helped make it what it is today.

Only saving grace is we have the likes of FPVUK and BMFA dedicated to saving the hobby.


#5

2.16. The Government’s view is that considering the responsibilities of the SUA operator, particularly with regards ensuring they do not permit or cause a remote pilot of their drone to fly in certain circumstances, the potential difficulty with data sharing arrangements and accessibility to insurance, a minimum age for a small drone operator of 18 is appropriate.
2.17 This would mean that anyone below the age of 18 could only be a small drone remote pilot for a drone of 250g-20kg in mass, and would likely in practice require the permission of the SUA operator to fly their drone.
2.18 If a drone is below 250g in mass, as many toy drones are, then there is no requirement for an SUA operator to register or for a remote pilot to meet the competency requirement. An SUA operator in this scenario could be under the proposed age of 18.

So proposed that you have to be older than 18 to fly a drone more than 20kg - not sure that would affect recreational use of multi Rita’s, but rather the larger model aircraft?


#6

Future review of the aerodrome restriction
3.24 Following the introduction of the 1km restriction on 30th July 2018 and at least one year of the restriction being in force, the CAA will be reviewing the restriction to assess its effectiveness, as well as other questions that are relevant to the policy.
3.25 The review will consider questions such as:
 What the minimal acceptable vertical separation between a drone and an aircraft should be;
 How the surrounding geography around specific airports could impact on this restriction;
 Areas where drones are likely to be used (such as public parks) which are near aerodromes, and could be issued with a permanent exemption;
 Whether additional aerodromes should be added to the list of protected aerodromes;
 Whether the restriction has had any impact on the number of drone sightings and Airprox reports near aerodromes;
 The number of permission requests generated, and what percentage were accepted or rejected; and
 Whether a different kind of restriction should be considered - such as radius circles near the runway thresholds.

So nothing coming soon here!


#7

Has everybody had the email from DJI about NODE? Seems DJI are on the case


#8

Was just about to post ……

===============================

Fellow drone enthusiast,

We need your support in helping to protect the rights of the drone community. The last few years have been a really exciting time in the advancement of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) or, as we like to call them, drones but important decisions lie ahead.

Recently, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) was granted power by the European Parliament and Member States to introduce a European set of rules, which will affect how and where you can use your drone. The draft regulation is currently undergoing final negotiation at EU level, but some countries are considering additional regulations that don’t fit so easily with EASA rules. Here is where you come in.

We are now helping start the Network of Drone Enthusiasts (NODE) in Europe, an international grassroots group dedicated to representing the interests of responsible drone pilots, and we’d like you to get involved and be heard. The group will speak with one collaborative voice to local and regional legislators, guiding them in developing effective rules and regulations that not only protect public safety but encourage the enjoyment and benefits of drone technology.

Just a small investment of your time will play a big role in protecting your rights and the rights of fellow drone owners and pilots.

Join the Network of Drone Enthusiasts today by:

  • Taking just 30 seconds to sign up on the website here.
  • Following NODE’s Facebook and Twitter accounts for the latest news.
  • Spreading the word about NODE with friends and fellow enthusiasts across the country.

Anyone who supports the advancement of drone technology is invited to join NODE.

Working together, we can help ensure that fair and consistent regulations will preserve our right to fly drones.

Sincerely,

DJI


Are you signing up to NODE?
#9

Has anyone read the EASA draft regulations?

Makes a horrible read. Pretty much kills homebuilds and racing drones over 250 gram.

EASA opinion. https://www.easa.europa.eu/sites/default/files/dfu/Opinion%20No%2001-2018.pdf

Draft regulations in downloads section - https://www.easa.europa.eu/document-library/opinions/opinion-012018#group-easa-downloads


#10

I’ve now found a reason supporting #Brexit. :open_mouth:

Edit: Yes - I know - chances are we’ll still comply to nearly anything the EU comes up with if we want to have any contact with the remaining countries.
#WasteOfTimeMoneyEverything


#11

Even if we leave the EU, we will be governed by the EASA during any transition period and possibly further. By that time any legislation will be adopted into UK law.

We wont even have a say as a non member so they need to get this one right.

Went through all this with vaping and the EU’s TPD regulations when they tried to kill that. House of lords tried to stop it but still had to be forced through.

Good thing is it’s only a draft, changes may be made and exemptions added.


#12

And when the UK’s descended into rapid downward spiral of ever increasing chaos … it won’t be high priority.

Or - through fear of actually attempting anything essential and important - it may be about the only thing they dare take a decision on. LOL


#13

The consultation period began on 26 July 2018 and will run until 17 September 2018.

From previous experience I am aware that not many individuals get take part but they do take account of individual views if enough as in a similar vein.


#14

I don’t want DJI to be my voice :frowning_face:

I’m not saying they won’t be biased… well, actually, yes, that’s exactly what I’m saying.