Outdoor access code Scotland

Tge thread on flying on foreshore in England has got me thinking what the law is up here in Scotland and how drone flying stands with the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 and Outdoor access code.

Only thing I could find referred to non motorised sports like paragliding and stated…

Access rights are exercisable above the surface of the land and so extend to non-motorised air sports, such as paragliding

https://www.outdooraccess-scotland.scot/Practical-guide/Public/airsports

Anyone clued up on this?

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Someone’s interpretation here but not found anything definitive yet.

Found this PDF from 2016 where they discuss electric bikes and drones but has still left me confused.

Pdf

  1. Drones:
    Background
    Various types of unmanned aircraft, commonly referred to as drones, have become available in the
    past few years and are being used for private leisure purposes as well as commercial aerial work.
    Drones used for leisure are generally lightweight, may be equipped with a camera, and are now
    relatively inexpensive (starting prices below £50) and readily available for purchase from shops
    and on-line retailers. There is little data about the numbers in users. For professional usage, the
    range of applications is wide and increasing, including surveillance, data gathering, film production
    (TV, marketing, promotional purposes), infrastructure inspection, conservation management, and
    agriculture and forestry operations. The size, level of sophistication and specification of those
    devices reflects this range of applications.
    Drones in relationship to access rights
    With the growth in use as a leisure activity, there has been debate about the rights and
    responsibilities that apply to the operation and use of drones. Concerns expressed have included
    perceived problems that the activity may pose over public safety, privacy, and potential disturbance
    to people, livestock or wildlife. On the other hand, the activity clearly interests and motivates a
    segment of the population to spend time in the outdoors, with a fresh perspective on their
    surroundings. There is debate over legal definitions, and also over the practicalities and
    requirements for supervision and enforcement through the general civil powers of the Land Reform
    (Scotland) Act, as compared to through other existing statutory regulatory mechanisms and
    agencies.
    The use of drones as a leisure activity can be interpreted as falling with the scope of ‘recreational
    purposes’ in Section 1(3)(a) of the Act. There has been discussion around whether the exclusions
    described in S9(f) on “being on or crossing land in or with a motorised vehicle…” are or are not
    relevant to the issue. While drones are motorised, it is not fully clear that they are a ‘vehicle’ with
    the meaning of being a conveyance. It has also been noted that a user could be flying a drone for
    recreational purposes while standing on land not requiring access rights, like a road or the
    foreshore, but nevertheless overflying land where access rights apply.
    The Code makes no specific mention of drones, although if it was taken to be within the scope of
    access rights, drone users would be required to undertake the activity in a manner that is
    consistent with the Code’s three guiding principles of respect for other people, caring for the
    environment and taking responsibility for your own actions. The closest reference comes in 2.14,
    where the Code suggests that “the use of powered model craft” is out-with access rights, but the
    activities envisaged at that time are not directly analogous to those involved in the use of drones,
    with the line taken by the Code being guided by the then current practice of powered model aircraft
    being most frequently associated with club or group use of facilities or sites.
    Access rights must be exercised in ways that are lawful and reasonable. Participation in several
    recreational activities is within access rights up to a certain level, beyond which legislative or
    regulatory controls exist which must be complied with, and where not doing so would then put that
    activity outside the access rights. For instance, being accompanied by a dog is clearly within
    access rights, but there are a range of statutory controls if dog-walking crosses boundaries into
    areas of dog control, sheep worrying or fouling. Similarly, nature study can normally pursued within
    access rights, but if it crosses a boundary into damage or disturbance of wild birds and animals,
    then statutory sanctions come into effect (see Annex One of the Code).

Ok seeing as you north of winter fell
Do they have a different organisation to the CAA?
Use that as your starting point and don’t let your dog abuse the sheep when it’s flying a drone​:rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl::rofl:

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Nope us wildlings north of the wall are still under CAA :wink:

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It was Hadrian that found nothing north of his wall worth the effort. :wink:

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Had there been Irn Bru, Tunnocks teacakes and malt whisky, I think it might have been a different story. :rofl:

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I had a packet of Tunnocks the other evening.

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I’m also a fan of square sausage! :+1:

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You have lost me is it like werther’s original?

Google is your friend! :wink:

Ah them things

pri_56510892

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Love their Caramel Waffers, too.

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Isn’t that against the drone code?

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But it’s not a drone! It’s a teacake! There is no “Teacake Code”, afaik?

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Yet…

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Tunnocks mmmmmmmmmmmmmm

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It’s called a “Teacake” but it’s not a teacake in the strict sense of the word, which would contain raisins and things. It’s basically a blob of sugar encased in very cheap chocolate!

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Blasphemy!! :wink:

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